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What Artist Marcus Leslie Singleton Can’t Live Without
Press
What Artist Marcus Leslie Singleton Can’t Live Without
New York Magazine December 12, 2023

We asked painter Marcus Leslie Singleton — whose debut solo show, Return From Exile, opens December 14 at Mitchell-Innes & Nash — about the “mysterious” oil color he uses the most, the grocery bag he throws art books in, and the work boots he wears in and outside the studio. Williamsburg Oil Paints makes high-grade oil colors. They’re made here in New York, so they’re local paint and pigment makers, which is great. I use oil specifically, and the color I use the most is called “Paynes Grey.” The reason I like this color so much is because it’s kind of in between grey, black, and purple. So when you add white to it, it becomes like a silvery, purpleish color — you know how streets are kind of not black, but not gray, they’re like that dark grayish color with a purpleish hue to it. I use this color for lots of shadowing and shading, and then I use it for a lot of asphalts. I use it to paint sidewalks, street scenes, buildings, and windows — like tinted windows. Sometimes I use it as black, because when you layer it, it becomes almost black, but it still has this purpleish hue to it, so it’s not quite black. If your eye picks up on it, you get a little curious. You’re like, Wait, this isn’t black, but what is this? It’s a very mysterious color, which I like.

Marcus Leslie Singleton at Frieze Seoul
Press
Marcus Leslie Singleton at Frieze Seoul
Frieze September 4, 2022

Marcus Leslie Singleton highlights the joys, routines and challenges of daily life as a Black man in contemporary America, navigating brutality and fetishization alike.

A Birthday Party Painted by Marcus Leslie Singleton
Press
A Birthday Party Painted by Marcus Leslie Singleton
The New York Times Style Magazine May 27, 2022

A new show of Marcus Leslie Singleton’s work opens at the Journal Gallery in Manhattan today. I talked to the artist about one of the included paintings for T Magazine’s On View series. “This work shows my sister’s 8th birthday party. She’s front and center getting ready to blow out the candles, and next to her is my grandmother Helen, who passed away last year. My cousin Daniel and I are to my sister’s right, and behind her is my cousin Zealand...That garland in the background here, that actually was a mistake — ‘happy’ has three Ps in it — but I made an artistic choice to leave it. I was painting this when people were getting the P.P.P. loans for coronavirus relief, so I thought I’d keep it as a tongue-in-cheek joke.”

Brooklyn-Based Painter Marcus Leslie Singleton on the Pros and Cons of Good Lighting, and Why the Best Art Works Telepathically
Press
Brooklyn-Based Painter Marcus Leslie Singleton on the Pros and Cons of Good Lighting, and Why the Best Art Works Telepathically
Artnet News July 19, 2021

One of the most promising young artists working today is Marcus Leslie Singleton, a Brooklyn-based painter whose work depicts the intimacy of Black communities in daily life. His figures, often joyful and familiar with one another, lounge on living room sofas or play cards beneath the shade of a mammoth patio umbrella. They shoot hoops in a sun-filled neighborhood basketball court and chat with friends at the local deli, mulling over buying a lotto ticket. In his work, Singleton distills, down to the moment, the parallel realities of Black joy and hardship with a kind of immediacy that is at once poignant and hopeful, love-filled and close-knit. Artnet News recently sat down with Singleton, who describes his work as an ongoing examination of “time and the Black body,” to hear about his new show at the Pit L.A., what he needs in his studio to make his work come together, and more.

Marcus Leslie Singleton Taps Into Basketball in new Release with Variable Editions
Press
Marcus Leslie Singleton Taps Into Basketball in new Release with Variable Editions
Juxtapoz July 15, 2021

We've been enjoying the editions coming through the newly launched platform Variable Editions, and are happy to see them putting out another release, this time with Marcus Leslie Singleton. Aiming to offer unique, yet more affordable works by the sought-out artists while having a charity side of their efforts, their next drop with the Seattle-born and NY-based artist will benefit Nazareth Housing NYC. "Currently, my work is a reflection on reality," Singleton wrote in the statement accompanying this release. "The thinking behind the work is to make something that has occurred at a certain point, specifically this strange, clouded time we’re all experiencing, atemporal. I don’t wish to make the memories, however painful, joyful, or graphic outlast time, my aim is to be truthful and as transparent through my art as I can so that in effect the thought inscribed in the work outlasts the constraints of time, and maybe that gets us somewhere." And such an approach to creating imagery seems to be fitting perfectly with Variable Editions' concept of creating unique works based on the same, screen-printed image.

Marcus Leslie Singleton at Turn Gallery
Press
Marcus Leslie Singleton at Turn Gallery
Artforum May 1, 2021

“Being a part of the circus is being born into this world,” said Marcus Leslie Singleton regarding his first solo exhibition, “Circusland,” at Turn Gallery in 2019. Across a series of twelve oil-on-panel works for this new show, Singleton traded the spectacle of acrobats and unicyclists for pointed yet subtle observations about contemporary Black life. Each of Singleton’s “Bubble Paintings” (2020–21) features ovoids—which double as cocoons, apparitions, or entrapments—set against colorful backgrounds with willowy leaves and branches. The forms evoke the visual language of comics and graphic novels: a world within a world, but with Black figures inside. In the press release, Singleton articulates this formal choice as reflecting a kind of exhausting duplicity—“how you could be physically somewhere and mentally in a different space.” Moreover, his approach highlights the anxieties of the African American experience, in which one is “policed and praised in the same breath.”

Marcus Leslie Singleton in conversation with Tschabalala Self
Press
Marcus Leslie Singleton in conversation with Tschabalala Self
Justsmile Magazine November 1, 2020

Marcus Leslie Singleton’s paintings use color and space to make the events of contemporary political life atemporal; to investigate the enduring emotional, intellectual, and experiential conditions that lie beneath the stories of our lives. Singleton is interested in the emotional and energetic resonances that his expressionistic use of color and shape can create. He elicits an affective response from the viewer, and prioritizes the imagining that art makes possible: he aims to step from the familiar Black monolith and define Blackness from an unknowing, atemporal space, as blank canvas. Aiming to ‘widen the peripheral of what this time means to us and our spirits,’ in his own words, the artist sets out to begin conversations and inquisitions not only for his audience, but within himself.