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Anonymous Was A Woman Names 2023 Winners, Including Artists Dindga McCannon, Carolina Caycedo, Barbara Kasten, Amanda Ross-Ho
Press
Anonymous Was A Woman Names 2023 Winners, Including Artists Dindga McCannon, Carolina Caycedo, Barbara Kasten, Amanda Ross-Ho
ArtNews December 14, 2023

Anonymous Was A Woman, the grant-making nonprofit that has awarded over $7 million to women-identifying artists since 1996, has named the 15 winners of its 2023 grants. Each recipient will receive an unrestricted prize of $25,000 each. “This year’s nominations were particularly impressive,” artist and AWAW founder Susan Unterberg, who does not sit on the jury, told ARTnews. “Hopefully, the world will see more of their work in the coming years. The winners are a really exciting group, not completely unknown if you look at their resumes, but I would say they are unknown to most people—their names aren’t getting big prices and they aren’t the ones we hear about, which seems to skew the idea that women aren’t doing so well.” More information on each winner can be found on the AWAW website.

‘Double Dare Ya’ talks gender, identity, and power
Press
‘Double Dare Ya’ talks gender, identity, and power
The Daily April 21, 2022

How is the transient experience of being a young woman captured and preserved? The memories tied up in the experience of girlhood and how young women express their identity and autonomy are explored in the Henry Art Gallery’s exhibition, “Double Dare Ya: Burns, Kurland, & Ross-Ho.” Running Feb. 4 through May 29, “Double Dare Ya” is a new exhibit in the Henry’s ongoing “Viewpoints” series, in which members of the UW community are encouraged to join the discourse on the artwork being exhibited. The “Viewpoints” series is organized by Nina Bozicnik, the assistant curator, and Kira Sue, a graduate curatorial assistant.

Amanda Ross-Ho at Mary Mary
Press
Amanda Ross-Ho at Mary Mary
Art Viewer December 11, 2018

Mary Mary is pleased to present HURTS WORST, Amanda Ross-Ho’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. The show will feature a suite of new large scale textile assemblages, and a group of small text-based paintings.

Amanda Ross-Ho
by Elizabeth Buhe
Amanda Ross-Ho
Art in America November 1, 2017

The exhibition also included six aluminum sculptures of clock hands hung near the gallery's entrance and, in the center of the space, two broad white tables covered with all manner of paraphernalia one might find in a studio, or in a carry-on bag: coins, X-Acto knife blades, scrunchies, gloves, wine glasses, and sleep masks. As she had done in previous work, Ross-Ho played with scale in this arrangement by including exaggeratedly large or miniaturized versions of some of the objects, such as jumbo paper clips and tiny beverage bottles. 

Amanda Ross-Ho
BY DAN FOX
Amanda Ross-Ho
Frieze October 17, 2017

‘Even a stopped clock gives the right time twice a day.’ That stoner koan from the 1987 comedy Withnail & I floated into my mind while looking at Amanda Ross-Ho’s solo show at Mitchell Innes & Nash. Twelve large clock faces, scrawled with colourful brush-marks, and pencilled notes-to-self, line the walls. The dials are missing their hands. These are hung in a forlorn line, each set to half-past six, near the entrance to the show. If the clock faces tell us that time is one subject of Ross-Ho’s show, then the dirty, outsized wine glasses, cups, forks, art materials and tools scattered across two big tables in the centre of the gallery tell us that scale is her other topic.

AMANDA ROSS-HO: “MY PEN IS HUGE” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH OCTOBER 14TH, 2017
By J. Garcia
AMANDA ROSS-HO: “MY PEN IS HUGE” AT MITCHELL-INNES & NASH THROUGH OCTOBER 14TH, 2017
Art Observed October 12, 2017

In some regards, size has always mattered to Amanda Ross-Ho. It’s hard to even recall a show of hers in which she hasn’t taken a common object and enlarged it to an uncommon size. In her 2012 show at MOCA’s Pacific Design Center, Teeny Tiny Woman, Ross-Ho even went so far as to create an oversize photo enlarger, underscoring her impressive sense of both scale and formal wit. With several years of practice under her belt since then, however, Ross-Ho’s simple enlargements have seemed to evolve quite considerably, perhaps best exemplified by My Pen is Huge, Ross-Ho’s new exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, which sees her adding to own work’s discourse by including life size objects alongside her oversized sculptures.

AMANDA ROSS-HO: My Pen is Huge
by Hovey Brock
AMANDA ROSS-HO: My Pen is Huge
Brooklyn Rail October 5, 2017

Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho has built a career focusing on the studio as locus, metaphor, and container for the creative process. Keeping her interests tethered to this line of inquiry has given her the freedom to cover a swath of art practices including sculpture, painting, photography, installation, and performance. In MY PEN IS HUGE, she gives us a book of hours aimed not at religious devotion but rather devotion to creativity, parsed into minute snippets of time.

For Amanda Ross-Ho, Losing Her Studio Was a Creative Gain
BY SCOTT INDRISEK
For Amanda Ross-Ho, Losing Her Studio Was a Creative Gain
Artsy October 3,2 017

“MY PEN IS HUGE” was absolutely perfect as a title because it did about 15 things at the same time. Language has this ability to do what I want my work to always be able to do, which is to have an elasticity and mutability. I loved the redundancy of naming what was actually happening in the show—which is about scaling my own mark-making larger. Also it’s obviously a piece of wordplay that’s supposed to fool you, this quick joke. And then it’s specifically about male arrogance, and the fallibility of it.

Goings On About Town
Press
Goings On About Town
The New Yorker October 2017

Last summer, around the time she lost the lease on her downtown-Los Angeles studio of nearly a decade, Ross-Ho found a collection of paper clock faces being unloaded by their manufacturer on eBay. These handless invocations of disorientation and eternity became her work surfaces and scratch pads until this past August, which she spent in the gallery painstakingly reproducing them as four-and-a-half-foot-square paintings. One is covered with doodled cubes, masks of tragedy, and hasty ballpoint notes like “Avoid grinding over steaming pots”; in another, the clock face is simply painted red. Along with an installation of novelty-sized objects both store-bought and custom-made—giant wineglasses, minuscule bottles of Evian water—the work suggests a powerfully unnerving vision of time as a procession of banal decisions adding up to something irrevocable. Six sets of large powder-coated clock hands hanging on the front wall make a fitting addendum.

Kara Walker, Amanda Ross-Ho, Tom Friedman, and More: The Fall Gallery Season Kicks Off
By Rema Hort
Kara Walker, Amanda Ross-Ho, Tom Friedman, and More: The Fall Gallery Season Kicks Off
Whitewall September 21, 2017

Amanda Ross-Ho’s show, “My Pen is Huge,” is like jumping through a rabbit hole and into a world where the gallery, Mitchell-Innes & Nash, has become a mad theater. The oversized wine glasses, blown-up hands of grandfather clocks, and other random objects are feel somehow completely necessary in the room. Coffee stains and pen scribbles cover the canvas and tables in the middle of the gallery. This show completely captures chaos in its most whimsical form.

On the Clock with Amanda Ross-Ho
By John Yau
On the Clock with Amanda Ross-Ho
BOMB Magazine September 15, 2017

In the weeks leading up to her current exhibition, MY PEN IS HUGE, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Amanda Ross-Ho prepared for the show in the gallery space in which her work would be on display. Poet and art writer John Yau visited her during this process.

‘My Pen is Huge’ by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
BY BLOUIN ARTINFO
‘My Pen is Huge’ by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery, New York
Blouin ArtInfo September 12, 2017

In an exhibition created within the walls of its display place, Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho installs (and creates) her latest exhibits at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash Gallery in New York. This hyperbole heavy exhibition, consisting of installations, sculptures and paintings, is called ‘MY PEN IS HUGE’.

Out of Site
By Paul Laster
Out of Site
Time Out New York September 6 – 12, 2017

A conceptual artist known for incorporating her studio activities in a theatrical, multidisciplinary practice, Los Angeles artist Amanda Ross-Ho created her latest exhibit, titled "MY PEN IS HUGE," right in Chelsea's Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery. 

Here Is Every Single New York Gallery Show That You Need to (Somehow) See This September
By Sarah Cascone
Here Is Every Single New York Gallery Show That You Need to (Somehow) See This September
artnet news September 7, 2017

Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho turned Mitchell-Innes & Nash into her studio for the month of August, working in the gallery to create new paintings and sculptures for her upcoming exhibition. The central motif will be the clock, featured in 12 large-scale paintings made last month based on drawings produced over the past year—compressing a year’s worth of work into just 31 days.

The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This September
BY SCOTT INDRISEK
The 15 New York Shows You Need to See This September
Artsy August 30, 2017

“I decided to use these surfaces as a place to record the relentless conscious, and subconscious, mark-making and stenography that takes place within my immediate and intimate personal tabletop spaces.” While working within her impromptu gallery-studio, Ross-Ho says she is “forensically translating” some of these studies into a dozen large-scale paintings. 

'MY PEN IS HUGE' by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
by Blouin ArtInfo
'MY PEN IS HUGE' by Amanda Ross-Ho at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York
Blouin Art Info July 30, 2017

In summer 2016, Ross-Ho found a collection of vintage paper clock face dials on Ebay, being liquidated from a clock maker. She acquired all of them, identifying the poetic potential and a vacant stage for activity on the blank clock faces, which were amputated from the mechanism and components, she started a series of works that evolved across her travels. She aggregated the surfaces of the clock faces with doodles, calculations, diagrams, lists, notes to self and other anxious scribblings, combined with the residue of her consumption of food and drink, as a visual documentation of her daily activities of life and art.

Surprises and Innovations Abound at Art Basel
By LOUIS LUCERO II
Surprises and Innovations Abound at Art Basel
The New York Times June 15, 2017

To wit: For the new work of the Los Angeles-based artist Amanda Ross-Ho, “Untitled Findings (ACCESS),” she has scattered enlarged replicas of keys across Basel.

Ms. Ross-Ho’s exaggerated keys, modeled after functioning ones that open doors to real locations around the city, are almost certain to be come across by passers-by who had no expectation of a run-in with an Art Basel installation that day — chance encounters echoing the imagined accidents by which the keys were lost.

In pictures: new art cross old Basel
by Hannah McGivern
In pictures: new art cross old Basel
The Art Newspaper June 13, 2017

“I’ve been a big fan of Amanda Ross-Ho’s work for a long time. She makes large-scale sculptural interpretations of everyday objects, like gloves and trousers. In this vein, she’s made a keychain based on her own Carabiner keychain and a bunch of keys that seem to have fallen off and are lost throughout the streets of Basel. They’re large—maybe 60cm long. We partnered with people from the Parcours area and asked if they would You might find one down by the river, up the stairway on the other side of the road, in a private garden. give the artist a copy of their key. It makes a nice meta-portrait of the local community.” 

Amanda Ross-Ho with Miranda July on the Whitney Biennial
By Stephanie Eckardt
Amanda Ross-Ho with Miranda July on the Whitney Biennial
W Magazine December 19, 2016

Miranda July speaks with fellow biennial alumni artists Edgar Arceneaux, Amanda Ross-Ho, and Catherine Opie to explain the survey and share their experiences with it. 

Amanda Ross-Ho Uses Shifts in Scale and Material to Jar Us Awake
By Katy Donoghue
Amanda Ross-Ho Uses Shifts in Scale and Material to Jar Us Awake
Whitewall May 13, 2016

Looking at work by the artist Amanda Ross-Ho can feel a bit dizzying, and that might be something she’s going for. Since she moved to L.A., her art has become a lot about her studio practice, about creating a loop of the micro and macro aimed at giving viewers a sense of vertigo that makes them want to look closer, hyper-aware of their surroundings. Ross-Ho uses shifts in scale or material to jar us awake. 

Review: ‘Image Object’ Looks at the Relationship Between the Virtual and the Physical
By Ken Johnson
Review: ‘Image Object’ Looks at the Relationship Between the Virtual and the Physical
The New York Times July 16, 2015

A Public Art Fund production organized by the fund’s associate curator, Andria Hickey, the exhibition presents sculptures by seven artists who have all exhibited internationally. It’s meant to address a particular condition of modern life: On the one hand, technologically mediated imagery constantly impinges on us from every direction; on the other, images are perpetually being turned into real things, like fancy cars and tall buildings. The exhibition’s introductory text panel explains, “As images are rendered into objects, and objects are circulated as images, the boundaries between the physical and the virtual are blurred, challenging us to rethink how we see the world around us.”

"Image Objects" Brings the Digital Outdoors
By Scott Indrisek
"Image Objects" Brings the Digital Outdoors
ArtInfo July 8, 2015

“Image Objects,” on view through November 20, brings digital culture to City Hall Park in New York. Organized by Public Art Fund and curated by Andrea Hickey — who also put together the sprawling group show “Objects Food Rooms,” currently on view at Tanya Bonakdar — the exhibition riffs on the complex interplay between two- and three-dimensions, between the computer-generated and the supposedly “real.” The artists on view, including Jon Rafman, Amanda Ross-Ho, and Lothar Hempel, all probe these unique tensions, often mixing cutting-edge technologies with old-fashioned materials. (Rafman, for instance, uses computer modeling software to create forms that are then hewn from marble.) In a conversation via email, I spoke with Hickey about how our obsession with sharing images of art on social media platforms is changing creative culture.

Biographical Marks: Q+A with Amanda Ross-Ho
By Paul Soto
Biographical Marks: Q+A with Amanda Ross-Ho
Art In America July 25, 2012

Amanda Ross-Ho's current show at L.A. MOCA's Pacific Design Center (PDC), "TEENY TINY WOMAN" [through Sept. 23], reinterprets the retrospective. Presented with the opportunity to survey her practice, the L.A.-based artist has chosen to reconfigure motifs from her practice, and display them in mutated forms on 17 large-scale Sheetrock panels made to represent, to scale, the perimeter of her downtown studio.

Amanda Ross-Ho
By Aram Moshayedi
Amanda Ross-Ho
Artforum June 21, 2012

“TEENY TINY WOMAN” is the first solo museum exhibition in Los Angeles by Amanda Ross-Ho. On view at the MoCA Pacific Design Center from June 23 to September 23, this show finds Ross-Ho characteristically spanning the disciplines of sculpture, photography, collage, and installation in a deliberately self-referential project that draws from and remixes her own output and artistic history of the past several years.

THE CLOSEST EXIT MAY BE BEHIND YOU
By Amanda Ross-Ho
THE CLOSEST EXIT MAY BE BEHIND YOU
This Long Century September 27, 2011

Amanda Ross-Ho presents a photo diary of personal vignettes.
__

THIS LONG CENTURY is an ever-evolving collection of personal insights from artists, authors, filmmakers, musicians and cultural icons the world over. Bringing together such intimate work as sketchbooks, personal memorabilia, annotated typescripts, short essays, home movies and near impossible to find archival work, THIS LONG CENTURY serves as a direct line to the contributers themselves.

Somebody Stop Me
By Anne Wehr
Somebody Stop Me
Frieze June 1, 2010

'Somebody Stop Me', Amanda Ross-Ho's title for her first New York solo show, has the platitudinous ring of a bumper sticker or the type of all-caps outburst that the American comic-strip character Cathy might make just before a frenzied spending spree at a shoe shop. (Punch-line: 'On second thought, don't!')

Amanda Ross-Ho, "SOMEBODY STOP ME"
By Paul Laster
Amanda Ross-Ho, "SOMEBODY STOP ME"
TimeOut New York April 26, 2010

Taking a conceptual approach to making objects, Amanda Ross-Ho mines her life, the Internet and her own art to create poetic works that investigate how language is structured and relationships are formed.

By Catherine Taft
Amanda Ross-Ho at the Pomona College Museum of Art
Artforum April 17, 2010

At the heart of Amanda Ross-Ho's recent installation at Pomona College Museum of Art, the Los Angeles-based artist's first solo museum exhibition, was a giant fiberglass candy dish in the form of a smiling wide-eyed ghost - the kind of novelty home decor one might expect to fond on the shelves of Target in late October but here inflated to larger than-life proportions.

Steel Sillman
Amanda Ross-Ho at the Pomona College Museum of Art
Art in America April 4, 2010

The title of Amanda Ross-Ho's recent solo show at the Pomona College Museum of Art, "The Cheshire Cat Principle," is a clear tip-off that she's an artist who thinks about invisibility. Things in her oeuvre, are not always what they seem. Working with images, objects and ideas from everywhere and anywhere--from mass culture to private life, from high-end philosophy to the diurnal routines of her feline companions--Ross-Ho sorts her gleanings in a studio world where improvisation and elaboration rule the day (and night). 

Introducing Amanda Ross-Ho
By Stacey Allan
Introducing Amanda Ross-Ho
Modern Painters March 3, 2008

"We can't get enough, because there's too much." In this statement for her nihilistically titled 2007 exhibition "Nothin Fuckin Matters," at Cherry and Martin in Los Angeles, Amanda Ross-Ho articulates a condition of cultural excess, in which freedom has become synonymous with consumer choice. In the face of a seemingly endless supply of desirable goods, we still can't get no satisfaction. 

Amanda Ross-Ho
By Catherine Taft
Amanda Ross-Ho
Modern Painters May 3, 2007

Amanda Ross-Ho's recent show, "Nothin Fuckin Matters," expanded on her ability to create disparate unions, mixing in her assemblages not only media but also unexpected formal and cultural references (think John McCracken's sensibility as interpreted by Punky Brewster, or Claes Oldenburg raiding a lumberyard) to create subtly rhetorical moves. 

Amanda Ross-Ho: Nothin Fuckin Matters
By Shana Nys Dambrot
Amanda Ross-Ho: Nothin Fuckin Matters
Art Review April 3, 2007

Los Angeles artist Amanda Ross-Ho combines a bare-bones DIY formal approach with a jaunty, high-minded conceptualism, employing sculpture, photography and installation to construct dimensional meditations on how humans occupy space. The exbition includes several examples of her mixed-media 'leaning' pieces - very large rectangles of Sheetrock leaning against gallery walls, on which are hung various photographic and canvas-based images, so that the Sheetrock panels function both as sculptural elements and as display walls themselves.